Mutants, Guns, and a Pariah

When it comes to the 90’s, we have lots to talk about.  There’s the early 90’s with great stuff like Acts of Vengeance, Foolkiller, Armageddon 2001, and more.  There’s the late 90’s with Kingdom Come, Avengers, Stars and S.T.R.I.P.E., and more.  The 90’s are more than just one title or even one genre, (Although as I am sure you have discerned, I’m a super hero guy), but sometimes it seems like they are boiled down into one guy.

 

Rob Liefeld.

No matter how many times I talk to folks about 90’s comics and insist that they are fairly good, and no matter how many times I even manage to find someone open-minded enough to let me talk to them as though 90’s comics might actually be worth looking at, they almost inexorably have to savage Rob Liefeld.

And I don’t mean just say they don’t like him, but you hear everything from how idiotic he is to how he can’t draw to how he ruined comics to how he wants to destroy Denmark.

Ok, you never hear that last thing; what you do hear though, is how much he loved shoulder pads, pouches, and big guns.  Hey man, he’s guilty of that, and guess what?  IT’S USUALLY AWESOME!

No one has ever had larger shoulder pads juxtaposed with a smaller gun.  Also, Boom Boom looks as 90’s as anyone ever has.  Possibly more so.
No one has ever had larger shoulder pads juxtaposed with a smaller gun. Also, Boom Boom looks as 90’s as anyone ever has. Possibly more so.

My biggest issue with all this now is how anyone fails to see how this captured the zeitgeist of the early 90’s perfectly.  Someone could take a gander at that, not know anything about superheroes, and could tell it is 90’s as hell.  Liefeld has faults, but he captured the essence of this era perfectly.  The 90’s were all about being bigger, bolder, and more confrontational than ever before.  We were extreme, and we didn’t give a shit who knew that or cared about it.

Look at the way wrestling was in the 90’s, or the way we Alternative Music rose to the heights it did.  Look at what we did at Woodstock ’99!  We wanted to be in everyone’s face, breaking all the rules, and making the big dot-com dollars!  We were all going to be rich, famous, and good-looking.  Obviously, I got all three, which is why I make so much money writing these blogs, people everywhere can’t stop saying my name, and folks never look away from my picture.  Or something different, whichever.

For better or for worse, these were the values then, and for better or for worse, X-Force was the embodiment of these values.  They were hard.  They were edgy.  They were led by a kick-ass, take no nonsense, character who believed in delivering the dream that Xavier had conceived that mutants and humans could live in harmony right to the doorstep of those who would destroy that dream.  He also carried a GIANT GUN to said doorstep.  And while that doorstep is a metaphor, that giant gun is most certainly not.

cable 1991
That gun sort of looks like how a Swiffer will look in the future.

My first exposure to X-Force came in the form, like many of my early 90’s comics exposure, of the 1991 Marvel Universe card set.  They’re just so cool.  Look at them!  There’s all sorts of delightful minutiae for a guy like me to devour.  First appearance?  Durability Stats?  Did You know?  Um, now I do, and I am ecstatic.

That’s sort of a stupid Did You Know.  You can’t see his leg, but I can tell from this picture that his leg and arm are obviously cybernetic, and cybernetic legs count for little as far as cool goes.  I mean, they don’t suck or anything, but they don’t scream cool the way a cybernetic arm does.  Although nothing beats a cybernetic eye with crosshairs on it.  I am a freaking mark for those.  HOW COULD THEY MISS?

But I digress, I wanted to show you the card that introduced me to X-Force…I reckon I can now!

Rather than their headquarters being unknown, I like to think of them as sharing a headquarters with The Riddler.
Rather than their headquarters being unknown, I like to think of them as sharing a headquarters with The Riddler.

I’m sort of a sucker for a few things, some of which y’all are already aware of, like cyborgs.  That alone would have had me enthralled with X-Force, but it didn’t stop there.  We also get a giant Native American, and while Warpath seems rather racist now, I loved him then, as he tied into my love of the Atlanta Braves. (I know, you’re thinking, what about the Kansas City Royals, Dean?  Relax, they’re still number one.  The Braves are my second favorite team.)  Throw in a guy with cool pilot goggles and a lady with a Spuds Mackenzie eye named Domino and I was instantly spellbound.  I didn’t even need to know anything else about the team, but the fact that they were once the New Mutants rang a bell for me.

I had a weird New Mutants comic when I was very young.  I got it when I was five, and I didn’t really comprehend it.  I remember Warlock being in it, and it being over my head, but I mostly remembered those guys looking like this:

Cannonball is cool because his legs disappear into back blast when he flies, but why is there magic marker all around Karma’s head?
Cannonball is cool because his legs disappear into back blast when he flies, but why is there magic marker all around Karma’s head?

Still, when I saw the connection between The New Mutants and X-Force, comic books became another thing I could know more than others about, and since trying to make others feel stupid was how I dealt with my insecurity at that time, this was truly a treasure trove of defense for me!

X-Force spent their first few issues kicking ass and looking cool, and if you tell me anything more important to a 13-year-old-boy than kicking ass and looking cool, I will tell you that we don’t discuss such things here and you are crude for having such a thought.

I would also show you this splash page from X-Force #1.

Between Feral, Wolfsbane, and Wolverine, all the X-teams at this time had a wolf person.  Was that mandated, or were wolf folks really that cool?
Between Feral, Wolfsbane, and Wolverine, all the X-teams at this time had a wolf person. Was that mandated, or were wolf folks really that cool?

 

Where is Cable jumping from in that picture?  He seems like he is hanging from an invisible trapeze, and let’s be honest, if he was, that would just make him even more hardcore.  Also with all of the other stuff we see Cable do, being in possession of an invisible trapeze would be completely unsurprising.

The issue culminates around X-Force raiding the headquarters of the greatly-named Mutant Liberation Front.  That name is amazing.  There should be more “front” teams in comics.  I mean, I guess they’d all have to be bad guys since terrorist groups seem to have a TM on using Front in their team name.

The MLF ruled though, and they looked so distinctive.  I liked Reaper with his scythe, Tempo in her quasi Iron Man get up, and Forearm with his…four arms.  Also, there were like a million guys in the MLF, from their Cable-clone leader Stryfe (hey sorry if I spoiled that for you!) to the enigmatic Zero.  There were all the guys I have mentioned plus Zero, Kamikaze, Wildside, Sumo, Dragoness, Strobe, Tumbelina, and more.  The idea of the numerous legions vs. the elite but small task force is an intriguing one in all sorts of fiction, but it was made familiar to us all in Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.

TMNT had swords on their cartoons too, but as awesome as it might have been and as much as we wanted to see it, Leonardo never did anything like this to Baxter Stockman or Slash, the Evil Ninja Turtle.

Shatterstar is able to easily slice people up because his sword has two blades.  DOUBLE CUTTING ACTION!
Shatterstar is able to easily slice people up because his sword has two blades. DOUBLE CUTTING ACTION!

 

Later, it would sort of become a thing that Reaper had body parts cut off.  I think he wound up with a cybernetic hand and leg.   After that, he ended up in the Ultraverse.  That’s a different conversation for a different article, though.  For now, just understand that Reaper was in the MLF, which was awesome, and therefore, by extension, Reaper is awesome.

I like Forearm a great deal, too, but I know his name is silly.  You don’t have to chastise me.

What I don’t like about X-Force is the entire “should I kill or not” trope that dominated superheroes also comes up quite often,  It’s extra annoying here because Cable is all “I can kill, but you can’t” to the rest of X-Force.  It reminds me too much of my own issues with authorities.

Of course, Cable is super awesome, so even when he is being a tight-ass, he is still a cyborg being a tight-ass.  Perhaps I would have tolerated authority better if the authorities had glowing eyes and metal arms.

 007 X-Force #1 - Page 12

Personally, I think it’s racism against Wolf Folks that made Cable decide it wasn’t ok for Feral to kill, but it was perfectly all right if he did.
Personally, I think it’s racism against Wolf Folks that made Cable decide it wasn’t ok for Feral to kill, but it was perfectly all right if he did.

 

I have complained about this before, and I am sure I will complain about it again, but it is just so stupid.  Kill or don’t, but quit the damn whining about it.  It’s as if many writers decided faux pathos and trite dialogue somehow substitute for genuine character development.   I’m not against tension or indecision in characters, but this gets old fast.  I’ve seen it in Darkhawk, and now I have seen it here.  Something tells me I am going to see it a lot more in this blog, whether I like it or not.

What I do like though, is Rob Liefeld’s Juggernaut.   Nothing can stop the Juggernaut, so nothing should look more powerful than he does, and few have drawn him with the inherent power and danger that Liefeld imbued him with.

Again, I have to ask, where is Shatterstar jumping from?  Did Cable lend him his invisible trapeze?
Again, I have to ask, where is Shatterstar jumping from? Did Cable lend him his invisible trapeze?

 

My favorite Juggernaut pic though, is this one.  In fact, it may be my favorite Juggernaut image of all time, which is saying something, because Juggernaut is my favorite super-villain.  Juggernaut looks angrier than a kid who had his pie stolen.  Not as sad though.

Is balloon stuffer a euphemism for a heroin dealer?  Also, note how Juggernaut is bleeding from his eyes, but he can still see.
Is balloon stuffer a euphemism for a heroin dealer? Also, note how Juggernaut is bleeding from his eyes, but he can still see.

 

 

X-Force is one of those titles that you love or hate.  I have been on both sides of the fence on it, and I like the view from both yards.  I can see why both sides come down on the side they come down on, and to be honest, I came into this expecting to detest it, or at least be meaner and snarkier about it.  Instead, I found myself enthralled by the magnitude of Liefeld’s art.  I found myself smiling as I recalled my days as a teenager who loved the excesses of this comic and just wanted to drink up the entire medium.  I smiled when I recalled how I became the comics hipster we all are at some point, denigrating Liefeld’s work as though it was inherently awful.  Now, I’m a man who appreciates that somehow, the dichotomy of those views make me work, and by bridging them together, I can appreciate the work for what it is while still recognizing its flaws.

There’s lots of X-Force left, and much of it doesn’t have Liefeld at all, but some of my favorite moments of the book (aside from the X-Statix stuff, which is crazy good), come from the period just after Liefeld leaves and forms Image; we will get to those next time I tackle X-Force, which will be quite sooner than later!   I had much more fun than I thought I would here; I miss X-Force tons, and I never would have believed it had I not gone back and devoured these Liefeld classics.  That’s right, I said classics.  No matter how you feel about him now, Liefeld changed the game.  X-Force changed the game.  No matter whether the change was for better or for worse in your opinion, the paradigm shift that came about can be directly attributed to Liefeld.  His early 90’s work had an energy and style that translated into what the era wanted at the time, and despite my days as a hipster, I find myself wanting more of his work now.  I don’t think I will be as kind to Youngblood, but X-Force is truly amazing in its own way, despite the flaws.  Give it a once-over and see if you don’t wind up agreeing with me, much to your shock and dismay over betraying the silly notion that you have held for years that “Liefeld ruined comics.”  If your self-revelation doesn’t cause you to die of a heartattack, then pick up the next issue of X-Force and enjoy the grandeur.

Be back here in two days for Bane and Doomsday in the Super-Blog Team-Up!

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8 thoughts on “Mutants, Guns, and a Pariah”

  1. Rather than their headquarters being unknown, I like to think of them as sharing a headquarters with The Riddler.

    Bwah-ha-ha-ha!!! I nearly did a spit-take when I read that. I probably shouldn’t be drinking coffee when i read your blog posts.

    Anyway, this piece was certainly insightful and hysterical. You raise some very good points. And you are absolutely right in your opening paragraphs. There do seem to be a number of “fans” who will vehemently argue than every single comic book from the 1990s was awful purely on the grounds that it was published during the same decade when Rob Liefeld shot to super-stardom, and therefore everything else within that ten year period is poisoned & corrupted by that mere association.

    Myself, I tend to adhere to Sturgeon’s Law, namely that ninety percent of everything is crap. And I think that is true for any decade.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Sidney! Glad you are reading! Wait until you see the Bane/Doomsday article tomorrow! And we have Starman and Neil Gaiman’s Death coming in the next couple of weeks!

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  2. I like X-Force because, like you I connected with it’s evolution fro mteh New Mutants. NM had basically turned into a disctintly different line up (BEFORE Liefield got ther) anyhow and this made sense. I jumped on around issu19 – right after Liefields departure and that’s actually the period I like best. Liefield doesn’t particularly bother me though. You’re right that his art captures the era perfectly. I’d take that a step farther and say he was one of those who really defined the look of the era going foreward. He certainly wasn’t hated then. That came more I think from constant missed deadlines at Image and the art style of comics moving on, while his personal style failed to evolve with the industry.

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    1. Absolutely! I love Cannonball leading the team around issue 19. I love when he goes to slap Xavier. Lots of great stuff around then.

      Liefeld defined an era, and made great comics that I love. It’s a shame he took offense to this article. I agree that his late deadlines and art moving past him hurt him.

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      1. I only just now read the twitter exchange…that was just bizzare. I’m not sure what was going on there, he’s got a reputation for being really nice with his fans. I didn’t see anythign particuarly denigrating in that post, I don’t know what he was thinking.

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      2. Yeah, I thought it was bizarre, but what can you do? He was threatened by something, One way or another, I still love his work here on X-Force.

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